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Stress, Anxiety and Hormone Balancing

                                   Stress is an inevitable part of life. However,  you may feel as if the anxiety and depressive thoughts are too much to handle, and you may struggle with physical fatigue and emotional exhaustion.  It is time to take appropriate measures  and seek help because you may have the the early signs of an anxiety disorder or depression caused by a hormone imbalance.

What Hormones are Involved in the Stress Response and Anxiety?

When confronted with a stressful situation the brain signals to the adrenal glands to produce more cortisol and adrenaline. Adrenaline effects are intense and powerful, but end quickly which is why this hormone is involved in panic situations and severe short-term anxiety.

The effects of cortisol are more prolonged, but continuously elevated cortisol levels can cause depression and impairment of memory. These hormones prepare the body to face a challenging situation through several mechanisms, including increasing the heart rate and blood pressure, raising the blood sugar levels to provide fuel to the brain and the muscles, and causing sensations of fear and panic that cause the individual to confront the threat or run away from it.
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Thyroid hormones and sex hormones are also involved in the stress response and anxiety. The thyroid gland produces hormones that enhance the metabolism, speed up the body's chemical reactions and create alertness. The sexual hormone deficit, which frequently occurs after menopause in women and andropause in men, negatively affects the nervous system pattern and the amount of neurotransmitter substances, potentially causing depression or anxiety if left untreated

How Can One Treat Anxiety and Depression Naturally?

The hormones that are involved in an excessive or improper stress response create an imbalance that leads to anxiety or depression if unaddressed in a timely manner. Anxiety is caused by excessive amounts of cortisol and adrenaline, and its symptoms include  permanent fear, panic, low productivity and insomnia.

Depression is caused by an alteration of neurotransmitters that regulate mood, especially serotonin, which causes feelings of continuous sadness, guilt and low self-esteem.

Restoring the hormone balance and enhancing the adaptation to stress involves making several lifestyle and nutrition changes, and utilizing natural treatments that will adjust your hormonal status. The first step, however, is to benefit from our easy, affordable testing, which will identify whether you suffer from a hormone imbalance that may cause anxiety or depression later. People in high stress jobs or stressful life situations are prime candidates for testing as they may be at risk for adrenal issues.   Our professionals will identify the specific hormone imbalance  that causes anxiety, low productivity or altered mood due to excessive stress. The easy, affordable testing can  then be followed by the design of a natural treatment regimen to address the root of the problem.

Engaging in regular exercise is a great way to lower your adrenaline and cortisol levels and enhance the serotonin in your brain. Also, an intense muscular workout helps increase the levels of sexual hormones, which further improves your mental well-being. A low-fat diet rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants is a great way to maintain a healthy heart and provide proper nutrition to your brain to fight stress.

Eat more whole-grain products, vegetables, fruits, fish, nuts and seeds. Reduce your consumption of high-fat meat, processed sugar, eggs, butter and cheese to lower your cholesterol and prevent toxic substances from reaching your brain. After you follow these simple steps, you will become the perfect candidate for nutritional supplements and herbal-based treatments that will restore your normal hormone balance and protect you from stress.


Jennifer Cebulak

Research Editor, canaryclub.org
 
 

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The Canary Club is an educational advisory group with a team of medical advisors headed by Richard Shames, M.D.