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Summer is over, the kids are back in school, and families everywhere are enjoying the cooler autumn evenings.  It’s a great time to incorporate some healthy habits into your regular schedule. Take time this fall – before the snow flies – to become more fit.


Outdoor and Indoor Recreation

The autumn months are truly beautiful and can be enjoyed with various outdoor activities.  A simple walk in a local park, an exhilarating run with a friend, a weekend of hiking or biking in the mountains – these are the things to be doing before winter’s chill sets in and drives you indoors.  You’ve only got a few weeks before the season is past; plan a few outdoor activities and get your heart pumping.  

Alternately, you may want to join a gym or enroll in a fitness class – there are many activities that you can do indoors during fall and the upcoming winter months.  Just think – you will be light years ahead if you work on getting in shape now, rather than in the New Year, when the holidays have already taken their toll on your waistline.  


Eat or Drink Your Greens

Many fruits and vegetables are at their peak in the fall.  When possible, buy fresh produce from neighborhood markets (or area farms) that are free from harmful pesticides and other chemicals.  Look for apples, broccoli, brussel sprouts, squash, grapes, pears, pineapple, sweet potatoes, mushrooms, pumpkins, turnips, and other fruits and vegetables that are in season.  Vegetable-laden soups and stews make delicious meals during the cooler months, but when possible, eat raw produce for the maximum number of nutrients and the greatest health benefit.  

If you need a way to get more raw produce in your diet, try juicing or making smoothies in the blender, which works especially well for fruits and vegetables that are over-ripe and difficult to eat.

Raw Asian-inspired Salad with Sesame Vinaigrette

Ingredients

1 red or yellow bell pepper, chopped
2 ribs celery, diced
3/4 cup chopped snow peas
1/2 cup fresh corn kernels (optional)
3 green onions (scallions), chopped
3 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro
1 tbsp balsamic vinegar
1 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp stevia
1 tsp cold-pressed sesame oil (coconut oil may be substituted)
1/4 tsp sea salt, or to taste (optional)

Preparation

1.  In a large bowl, combine the bell pepper, celery, snow peas, corn, green onions and parsley.

2.  In a separate small bowl, whisk together the remaining ingredients and drizzle over the vegetable mixture, tossing well to combine. Season with sea salt, to taste.

3.  If you have time, chill before serving. Toss again immediately before serving.

Best Fruits and Vegetables for Juicing

  • Apples:  for cleansing the digesting system, boosting the immune system, and reducing cholesterol; good as a base juice
  • Pineapples: have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and antiviral properties; help to dissolve blood clots

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  • Papaya: helps to breakdown protein, aids in digestion, replenishes vitamin C in the body, and protects against cancer.
  • Tomatoes: lower the risk of cancer, good for heart-health
  • Berries: have antiviral and antibacterial properties; strawberries help the cardiovascular system; raspberries help to ease menstrual cramps; blueberries help urinary infections and diarrhea
  • Cabbage: fights cancer, aids in estrogen balance and regulating metabolism, acts as a detoxifier, good for stomach problems and ulcers
  • Broccoli: helps to regulate insulin and blood sugar, contains vitamin C, high in antioxidants

 


Check Your Hormone Levels
If you are not feeling like your healthy, fit self and suspect you may have a hormone imbalance, get a test to check your hormone levels.  You can accurately test your reproductive, thyroid, and adrenal glands with a home testing kit.

Jennifer Cebulak,

Research Editor


  http://vegetarian.about.com/od/rawfoodsrecipes/r/rawsalad1.htm
  http://www.all-about-juicing.com/best-fruits-and-vegetables.html

 

 

 

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The Canary Club is an educational advisory group with a team of medical advisors headed by Richard Shames, M.D.