Science Daily : Hormone Disorders
Hormone Disorders News -- ScienceDaily
Read the latest research on endocrinology. Learn about hormone disorders, new hormone treatment options, hormone therapy and more.

Hormone Disorders News -- ScienceDaily
  • Study counters long-time practice of prescribing more fertility hormones
    Too much of a hormone commonly used during in vitro fertility, or IVF, treatments actually decreases a woman's chances of having a baby, new research indicates. The research is the largest study to analyze more than 650,000 IVF cycles in women nationwide.

  • Sex reassignment surgery may be better for transgender women’s health than hormones only
    Transgender women may be at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes compared with men and women in the general population. New research finds that transgender women who received only hormone therapy had poorer metabolic health than transgender women who underwent sex reassignment surgery in addition to receiving hormone therapy, suggesting that sex reassignment surgery may be metabolically protective.

  • Short winter days trigger aggression hormones differently based on sex
    Researchers have discovered a hormonal mechanism in hamsters that connects short winter days with increased aggression in females, and that it differs from the mechanism that controls this same response in males.

  • Researchers identify new diabetes risk mechanism
    An unexpected effect from a gene known to increase diabetes risk has been identified by researchers. They assumed that the specific allele in the gene TCF7L2 which increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, impairs insulin production in response to increased insulin resistance. Some slight evidence of that was found, but more significantly the researchers discovered that this variant impaired a person’s ability to balance blood sugar (glucose) by suppressing glucagon – the hormone that raises the level of glucose in the bloodstream.

  • Genes may determine the side effects of menopausal hormone therapy, study suggests
    Cardiovascular disease risk in women increases after menopause and is associated with the drop in estrogen levels. Menopausal hormone therapy could slow the progression, but oral formulations also increase the risk of blood clots. A new study reports that whether a woman will obtain cardiovascular benefits from certain types of hormone therapy may depend on her genes.

The Canary Club is an educational advisory group with a team of medical advisors headed by Richard Shames, M.D.