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Science Daily : Hormone Disorders
Hormone Disorders News -- ScienceDaily
Read the latest research on endocrinology. Learn about hormone disorders, new hormone treatment options, hormone therapy and more.

Hormone Disorders News -- ScienceDaily
  • Vitamin D deficiency may reduce pregnancy rate in women undergoing IVF
    Women with a vitamin D deficiency were nearly half as likely to conceive through in vitro fertilization (IVF) as women who had sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study. Long known for its role in bone health, vitamin D is a steroid hormone that is emerging as a factor in fertility.

  • NSAIDs may lower breast cancer recurrence rate in overweight, obese women
    Recurrence of hormone-related breast cancer was cut by half in overweight and obese women who regularly used aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, according to a study. The study found that women whose body mass index (BMI) was greater than 30 and had estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha)-positive breast cancer had a 52 percent lower rate of recurrence and a 28-month delay in time to recurrence if they were taking aspirin or other NSAIDs.

  • Finding new ways to treat hormone receptor-positive breast cancer
    A leading scientist has been awarded a grant of around £20,000 by research charity Breast Cancer Campaign to find new ways to treat hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, the most common type of the disease.

  • Common chemical in mothers may negatively affect the IQ of their unborn children
    In some women, abnormally high levels of a common and pervasive chemical may lead to adverse effects in their offspring, researchers report. The study is the first of its kind to shed light on the possible harmful side effects of perchlorate in mothers and their children. "The reason people really care about perchlorate is because it is ubiquitous. It's everywhere," said one investigator. "Prior studies have already shown perchlorate, at low levels, can be found in each and every one of us."

  • Why weight-loss surgery cures diabetes: New clues
    Scientists are a step closer to understanding why diabetes is cured in the majority of patients that undergo gastric bypass surgery. "Our research centered on enteroendocrine cells that 'taste' what we eat and in response release a cocktail of hormones that communicate with the pancreas, to control insulin release to the brain, to convey the sense of being full and to optimize and maximize digestion and absorption of nutrients," said the study's team leader.

The Canary Club is an educational advisory group with a team of medical advisors headed by Richard Shames, M.D.