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Science Daily : Hormone Disorders
Hormone Disorders News -- ScienceDaily
Read the latest research on endocrinology. Learn about hormone disorders, new hormone treatment options, hormone therapy and more.

Hormone Disorders News -- ScienceDaily
  • Astonishing regeneration potential of the pancreas
    Up until puberty, the pancreas is more adaptable and possesses a greater potential for self-healing than had previously been assumed. Type-1 diabetes is caused by the loss of so-called pancreatic beta cells, the cells that produce the hormone insulin, which is essential for regulating the use of sugar in the body. Since beta cells do not regenerate, scientists have traditionally assumed that the loss of these cells is irreversible; indeed, diabetic patients require insulin injections for life.

  • Type-1, type-2 diabetes caused by same underlying mechanism? Toxic clumps of hormone amylin may be to blame
    New findings provide compelling evidence that juvenile-onset or type-1 diabetes and type-2 diabetes are both caused by the formation of toxic clumps of a hormone called amylin. The results suggest that type-1 and type-2 diabetes could both be slowed down and potentially reversed by medicines that stop amylin forming these toxic clumps.

  • Vitamin D deficiency may reduce pregnancy rate in women undergoing IVF
    Women with a vitamin D deficiency were nearly half as likely to conceive through in vitro fertilization (IVF) as women who had sufficient levels of the vitamin, according to a new study. Long known for its role in bone health, vitamin D is a steroid hormone that is emerging as a factor in fertility.

  • NSAIDs may lower breast cancer recurrence rate in overweight, obese women
    Recurrence of hormone-related breast cancer was cut by half in overweight and obese women who regularly used aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, according to a study. The study found that women whose body mass index (BMI) was greater than 30 and had estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha)-positive breast cancer had a 52 percent lower rate of recurrence and a 28-month delay in time to recurrence if they were taking aspirin or other NSAIDs.

  • Finding new ways to treat hormone receptor-positive breast cancer
    A leading scientist has been awarded a grant of around ÂŁ20,000 by research charity Breast Cancer Campaign to find new ways to treat hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, the most common type of the disease.

The Canary Club is an educational advisory group with a team of medical advisors headed by Richard Shames, M.D.