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Supplements

With one third of the United States' adult population considered obese, it's no wonder the US weight loss market is a $60 billion industry. Fad diets, "miracle" pills and the ultimate workout routine headline everything from our daily news programs to late night infomercials. But what if part of the solution we're searching for is as simple as a well-known, though often insufficient, fat-soluble vitamin we're all quite familiar with? Research suggests it may be.

Astragalus
Astragalus membranaceus or milk vetch has been used in Chinese medicine for over 2,000 years to strengthen the immune and respiratory systems and to fight the flu. Astragalus belongs to a class of herbs called adaptogens, and helps the body handle stress. Astragalus also fights pathogens like bacteria and viruses.
Dosage: one dropper of tincture of Astragalus (standardized to 15 percent polysaccharides) to a hot liquid like tea or soup three times a day. As tablets, take 350 to 400 milligrams three times a day.

Zinc: Zinc inhibits the reproduction of rhinovirus, and has been found to be especially good for treating viral sore throats. A recent study on the effectiveness of zinc showed that taking a zinc lozenge every 2-3 hours, shortened the duration of cold symptoms. Overdosing with zinc can have side effects, such as an effect on the uptake of iron.
Dosage: one lozenge every 2-3 hours for duration of the cold or flu. Keep in the mouth for 5-10 minutes. Or 30 to 50 milligrams a day.

 

Echinacea: Echinacea has powerful antiviral and immunity-boosting effects. It is used to rev up the immune system at the first sign of a cold. Echinacea has been found to work better before you get sick, to build up immunity. It has not been found as effective for treating a cold or flu.
Dosage: take daily according to manufacturers instructions. Take daily during the fall and winter months.

Vitamin C: Vitamin C daily can help prevent the flu.

Clinical studies have shown that large megadoses of Vitamin C are bit absorbed by the body.

Vitamin C is concentrated in the white blood cells that fight disease. Vitamin C is a free radical scavenger and helps protect the white blood cells.